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The World’s 5 Greatest Art Galleries

At EzeFrame, we have a passion for art, and we try to feed that passion as often as possible by visiting museums and galleries. Not only does this give us some pretty good inspiration for our picture frames, it also keeps us inspired and motivated – after all, how can you stay in a bad mood while looking at Van Gogh’s "Starry Night", Klimt’s "The Kiss" or Vermeer’s "Girl with a Pearl Earring"?

No matter where you go in the world you can find amazing art – whether it’s a 21st-century conceptual installation or an ancient cave painting. But of all the galleries on the planet, these five have to be some of the finest.

The Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Amsterdam, capital of the Netherlands, is an incredibly popular tourist destination, famous for its canals, cafe scene and cosmopolitan vibe. It’s also home to the brilliant Rijksmuseum, a gallery originally founded in The Hague in 1800, and relocated to Amsterdam eight years later.

Back in the 16th and 17th centuries, Dutch painters were at the forefront of the European art scene. Known as the Dutch Masters, artists such as Rembrandt, Johannes Vermeer and Frans Hals were famous for painting in an intensely realistic manner that drew heavily on light and shade.

The Rijksmuseum stands partly as a monument to these great artists, housing masterpieces such as Rembrandt’s "The Night Watch" and Vermeer’s "The Milkmaid". However, it’s also home to arts & crafts collections, historical artefacts, and a small Asian collection housed in its own pavilion.

The Uffizi, Florence

Italy has enjoyed a long association with art. Home to some of the greatest artists to have ever lived (da Vinci, Michelangelo and Caravaggio to name just three), it’s a country packed with excellent museums and galleries – not to mention fresco-laden churches everywhere you look.

Of all Italy’s art venues, though, the Uffizi in Florence has to be the most spectacular. Originally built in the 16th century, this impressive gallery rests on the banks of the Arno River, a stone’s throw from the medieval Ponte Vecchio bridge. It also houses a huge number of famous artworks, starting with ancient Greek sculptures and working up to the 18th century – although the focus here is largely on Renaissance paintings.

Highlights include Botticelli’s "The Birth of Venus", Titian’s "Venus of Urbino" and Caravaggio’s "Medusa" – but you’ll also want to keep your eyes peeled for the da Vincis!

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

New York is home to many excellent galleries and museums, but the Metropolitan Museum of Art (known to locals simply as "the Met") is hard to beat. Situated on Fifth Avenue just inside Central Park, this sprawling building houses a permanent collection of over two million artworks.

The different departments span the globe, and many centuries. Highlights include the Asian Art collection, which houses a print of Hokusai’s "The Wave", the Egyptian Art collection, home to “William”, the Faience Hippopotamus (the museum’s unofficial mascot), and the Drawings and Prints collection, where you’ll find works by Albrecht Durer.

For the EzeFrame team, though, it’s the museum’s modern and contemporary rooms that we love the most. Here you’ll find works by Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Kandinsky, Modigliani and Henri Rousseau.

Tate Modern, London

London is another city where you’re spoilt for choice when it comes to art galleries and museums. For sheer innovation and atmosphere, though, the Tate Modern has to be our favourite. This gallery sits on the banks of the Thames and is housed in a former power station.

Opened in 2000, the Tate Modern is paired with the Tate Britain (located in Pimlico and accessible by a river boat that runs between the two). Its crowning attraction is the Turbine Hall, a capacious room several storeys high which is used to house temporary installations from cutting edge modern artists. Works which have appeared in this space include "Marsyas", a vast red structure designed by Anish Kapoor, and Ai Weiwei’s "Sunflower Seeds", an installation which was comprised of 100 million hand-crafted porcelain seeds.

The gallery is also notable for its innovative organisation. Instead of arranging pieces by chronology, the Tate Modern arranges them by theme. Some of the famous works hanging here include Georges Braques’ "La Guitare" and Roy Lichtenstein’s "Whaam!" – although with no chronology to guide you, to find them you might have to wander through the various collections for a while…

Palace Museum, Beijing

Wonderful art galleries exist everywhere in the world – and in fact, the most popular gallery on the planet can be found in Beijing. The Palace Museum is housed in an imperial palace once known as the Forbidden City. It is situated in the centre of Beijing and, from 1420 to 1912, was the home of the Chinese emperor.

Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987, this spectacular building is home to a vast collection of artworks and artefacts. Pay a visit to this one-of-a-kind gallery and you’ll find hundreds of thousands of ceramic and porcelain pieces, around 50,000 paintings and a large array of jade and bronzeware. If you’re interested in Chinese history, this is one gallery you absolutely cannot miss.

Turn Your Home Into an Art Gallery: Picture Framing with EzeFrame

Whether you’ve travelled extensively and have a lot of photographs, you pick up art postcards at every gallery you visit, or you simply have your eye on a couple of prints of your favourite paintings, EzeFrame is here to help.

We can provide a variety of picture frames and picture mounts for all kinds of image sizes – in fact, our service is centred around custom made frames. All you have to do is measure your image (be it a photograph, postcard, print or canvas), put in your dimensions, and choose your frame and mount styles.

You might not be able to feed your art addiction at a gallery every day – but you can certainly help liven up the walls of your bedroom or living room with a beautiful print in a fantastic picture frame.

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